Monday, 27 February 2017

February Favourites

So this is my first favourites post and let me tell you, its a good one, everything from books to food. I can't believe quite how fast this year is going, we're so close to March its ridiculous. It's been a strange month for me and I'm really glad it's over if I'm honest. 

Friday, 24 February 2017

5 Ways To Stay On Top Of Work


So needless to say any type of work be it education, house tasks or employment, can be boring at times and difficult to get through. You leave it for a day, then another and soon you realise you're so close to the deadline and you've procrastinated so much you have nothing done; panic sets in. Remember we are all guilty of this at some point even though some people wont admit it. I have always been a procrastinator when it came to education and house work, however now I'm doing a degree (at home with the Open University) and i have a flat of my own to run i have to be even more aware of staying on top of things. 

Wednesday, 22 February 2017

Staying Positive And Combating Every Day Stress

So we all have tough times in life, whether you suffer from mental illness or not. Life throws us all sorts of obstacles to get through and sometimes it can be hard to know how to keep positive and not let the stress get to you. So I'm here to give you some of my top tips for staying positive and fighting stress, which hopefully can help you too.

Monday, 20 February 2017

Get To Know Me More In 25 Questions

Cornwall, 2016
So I thought this would be a fun way to get to know me a little more. I'm planning on doing a few questions posts.

1. What is your middle name?
A- Rose Elisabeth
2. What is your favourite colour?
A- Grey
3. How many countries have you visited?
A- Between 10 and 13 I can't remember exactly.
4. What is your favourite animal?
A- Elephant

Thursday, 16 February 2017

That Feeling Of Not Being Good Enough


When I was first told about my Fibromyalgia I was happy in a sense, maybe the wrong word, relieved is better, I had a reason for feeling so awful and in pain all the time, I thought people might actually believe me now, let me learn how to live and that was that. However, in the 6 months since, I have had so many learning curves in relation to living with a disability. I had to grieve my old life, the old way of doing things because I needed to look after myself and learn to become happy again in a world where I felt everything I did was wrong.

My very first realisation was my consultant, while lovely and helpful he started to tell me all the drugs and programmes that can manage my diagnosis and keep the pain at bay. This abled person, who has no idea how hard this has been and continues to be is sitting in his comfy chair being paid thousands to tell me it will be fine I’ll resume my normal life and he wants to discharge me. Then he ushers me out the room and sends me off. With this news, on my own into the world, that's that. My life, categorised by a single 15-minute appointment, I felt every emotion in about a second.

Society has this preconceived idea that the disabled are not mentally or physically capable to carry out a "normal" day to day life. Of course, it differs for everyone but all of us have the ability to be a member of society. I think abled people forget while we do have diagnoses we all are more than our illnesses. We love people, we have interests and hobbies, we learn. It’s a matter of adjusting for us. Our life has a purpose with or without the same things an abled person has. 

In today's world, we are taught that everyone is equal. Everyone deserves the same treatment, but unfortunately, like a lot of minority groups, most disabled people have faced problems. Employment is one area of life that can be severely affected; employers not wanting to make adjustments, not hiring you, bullying etc. Businesses think of money, in fact, money rules almost everything in life. While legally you aren't supposed to be discriminated against in employment we all know it happens way too frequently. Don’t believe me here are a few news stories.
Me, Before Diagnosis, France 
We are taught that being on benefits and getting help is a sign of weakness, that we should be ashamed and that we are 'screwing' the system mainly because of a few abled people who do use the system to make their life easier. Benefits are there for those who need it, the truth is it's hard enough to get on and stay on it and it's barely anything in comparison to what we could get while working but it's something rather than nothing. We don't need to work to feel proud of ourselves and we don't have to work to please others. 

I haven't even started on just how the ablest treat the disabled in general. When someone is visibly unwell or disabled for example carrying a stick, you sort of expect a level of respect and compassion. This doesn’t always happen. I was out with my partner, James, who uses a stick to walk and stay up right. On a busy train, he was made to stand the entire journey, while business men, school children and other general commuters sat there ignoring him. It's an inconvenience to them, obviously not understanding is a major part of it, but where has the care in the world gone? There are so many stories of people being rude, cruel and unkind to people with disability, and it saddens me that we can be abused so easily. Society has such strict rules and ideas of how people should be in every sense of their self; appearance, ambition, class etc and when you don't fit the mould you are ridiculed. 
Kindness and compassion are free. It's not something that requires effort, but something that can make all the difference. More understanding would be brilliant, but we cannot expect that from everyone. We can, however, believe in the power of people, the power of kindness. At least I believe in it. 

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Tuesday, 14 February 2017

Everyday Problems Associated With Chronic Illnesses

Banner Header, France
So having chronic illnesses rules my life. I try not to allow it but unfortunately, it sometimes wins. Flare ups happen at the worst times. They are unpredictable, debilitating, sad and isolating. It's when all my symptoms come together and increase their attack. I get symptoms which only occur during flare ups and I have symptoms that never leave. You learn to distinguish between the two after a while.
So what problems do we face living with multiple chronic illnesses?